Surfing at the Cliffs of Moher

Surfing at the Cliffs of Moher
Surfing at the Cliffs of Moher Surfing has become extremely popular along the western Irish seaboard, and particularly in Lahinch, Fanore, Doolin and Spanish Point. In fact, one of the world's biggest surfing waves can be found at the Cliffs of Moher. Aileens Aillenasharragh  - from the Irish, Aill Na Searrach (‘Leap of the Foals’) is the first headland of the Cliffs of Moher on the Doolin side and it reaches a height of 632 ft/192m. With large oce

Movies made at the Cliffs of Moher

Movies made at the Cliffs of Moher
Movie Magic – Famous scenes shot at the Cliffs Of Moher Over the years, there have been many movies made at the Cliffs of Moher, and more recently, music videos from artists around the world. Harry Potter & the Half Blood Prince (2009) Harry and Dumbledore appear standing on a rock which is moving towards a sea cave in the face of a towering cliff. Through the miracle of modern technology the rock in the sequence is actually Lemon Rock, off the Iveragh

Seabirds at the Cliffs of Moher

Seabirds at the Cliffs of Moher
Learn More about the Seabirds at the Cliffs of Moher Our boats position you with the best views of the Cliffs of Moher and the seabirds nesting on their rock shelves. Incredibly, there are over 30,000 seabirds in residence at the cliffs! Puffin The Cliffs of Moher holds the largest mainland colony of Puffins (1,365) in Ireland. Description: Small comical bird, black and white evening suit and colorful bill Nests: Underground in burrows and grassy summits n

Getting to Doolin Pier

Getting to Doolin Pier
Directions from Limerick, Shannon and Ennis: In Limerick follow the signs for the M18, Shannon airport or Ennis. (Shannon Airport is approx 1 1/2 hours drive from Doolin.) Take the M18 from Limerick to Ennis, you bypass the town of Ennis. Take the N85 from Ennis to Ennistymon via Inagh. Drive straight through Ennistymon towards Lisdoonvarna on the N67. At the 2nd crossroads after the village of Kilshanny, turn left onto the R478. This road will bring you...

About the Aran Islands

About the Aran Islands
The Aran Islands were once part of a craggy ridge of limestone that extended from the Burren in County Clare. Worn down by fierce storms over millions of years, its three small islands are slowly, steadily being eroded into the sea. The islands are one of the few remaining "Gaeltachts" where Irish remains the primary language. Islanders today lead very modern lives, but they maintain many traditions and remain connected to the land and sea on a level to...